The Reboot of an Icon You Don’t Want to Miss: Child’s Play (2019) Review

Chucky is among one of the most famous horror icons, particularly during the 70’s or ’80s. Back then, monsters, villains, or whatever you name them has badly-created movies that would put people to sleep on theatres instead of scaring them. However, it’s a different story for our most beloved horror doll.

Our deranged serial killer toy has been written by different writers for years on the franchise. All portraying a silly doll that loves to kill people. Despite its silly nature that could make you cackle a bit while being scared, Chucky is still the undisputed king of horror icons compared to other big names such as Freddy on Nightmare on Elm’s Street or Jason from the Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

The franchise made Chucky a consistent icon in the pop culture for decades thanks to its original creator Don Mancini. However, things have started to changed direction this 2019 with the absence of Mancini. This resulted in a reboot of the franchise that focuses on our current technology to build Chucky’s character. Although it sounds bad on paper, seeing the movie itself was a breath of fresh air.

Synopsis

  • Taking a look at the narrative side of things, Chucky was remade in the eyes of director Klevberg and writer Tyler Burton Smith. Chucky is one of the products that are made by the Kaslan Corp that are designed to interact with people and control home-based technologies. Much like Cortana or Alexa in the form of a doll. Among all of the dolls being made by the corp, Chucky is one of the “glitchier” types of them all.
  • Because of its defective nature, Chucky was returned to the company and fell into the hands of Karen Baclay, portrayed by Aubrey Plaza, that works on a big-box store. Karen successfully stole the doll and gave it to her son Andy (Gabriel Bateman) as a gift. As time goes by, Andy and Chucky became close friends that it came to the point where the two of them are like glued together. However, things start to go down because of software malfunctioning that turned Chucky from a loving doll into a killing machine that needs to be stopped.

The reboot isn’t trying hard to be deep, unlike other horror movies. There are also times where it felt dragging at some points, but this doesn’t mean that the movie is terrible in some sorts anyway. Packed with an ample amount of kill sequences paired with Mark Hamill’s spectacular performance, the 90-minute feature film will make you feel satisfied once you leave the theatre.

One of the strongest points of the franchise is Chucky’s cute appearance that contrasts its killing nature, which is most evident in its past movies. It lessened down to this 2019 reboot, however, and Chucky looks way creepier instead of cute. However, the highlight of the film is Chucky’s creativity in using the environment, or whatever he can find, in killing people. What was once an ordinary boiling room will turn into a place of horror in a matter of minutes.

Verdict

  • If you’re an avid fan of the franchise, then you’re probably doubting by now whether to spend a few bucks in watching the movie or just let it go. Namely, because the film itself has no connection with Chucky’s original creator Don Mancini. But if you put all these negative feelings aside, you will definitely appreciate Chucky in its new form. Thanks to its outstanding cast paired with a fun cinematic experience that will make you hold on to your chair, Child’s Play (2019) deserves a spot on your movie bucket list.

The Perfect Finale of an Era: Toy Story 4 Review

The first installment of the Toy Story series has received massive success in its time. This is because it’s the first full-length film that is fully 3D animated. It’s surprising back then how technology can handle such a thing which gave a wow factor to all audiences. As time goes by, a couple of sequels have been released. And it seems like Toy Story 3 is the final nail to the coffin. But the tables have turned the moment Toy Story 4 was announced.

Of course, Disney/Pixar had outdone their selves once again on surprising people with unexpected sequels. This fresh installment of Toy Story introduces new characters while retaining its comical story that can put kids and also, adults entertained throughout the entire film, which makes Toy Story 4 the best “Toy Story” to date.

Synopsis

  • Toy Story 4 begins a couple of years after Woody, Buzz, and the rest of the toys are re-homed to their new owner Bonnie. The scene shows a road trip of the young girl worrying about how her kindergarten life would be. This led to various events that introduce a new character Forky, voiced by Tony Hale, who’s gone AWOL on vacation. Woody is also reunited with Bo Beep, voiced by Annie Potts, which then led to their spectacular adventure of a lifetime.

Toy Story 4 is just like the same good ol’ Toy Story that features a comical storyline that most Pixar movies are known for. Although sounding repetitive, but at least it still entertains children as well as adults that can give good laughs.

The strongest point of the movie is the relationship between Woody and Bo Beep, where their separation played a vital role in the story’s narrative. The chemistry between the two is also built-up to heighten the drama, especially when scenes are shown on what happened in their separation in the form of a flashback.

But it doesn’t end there, since this is a new Toy Story movie, it also means “new” toys to love. Such example is Duke Kaboom, which is voiced by Keanu Reeves, and Duck/Bunny, which are voiced by Keegan Micheal-Key and Jordan Peele. Not to mention, the new villain named Gabby Gabby which is voiced by Christina Hendricks. The character was very well portrayed, which is a mixed bag of kindness and menace that will make you feel love for her, and at the same time, hate.

Toy Story 4 teaches you how to let go of things, which is also the same thing for the third installment of the series. What’s different is that it’s very well portrayed in this movie compared to its predecessor — making it the perfect finale to end the quadrilogy.

Verdict

  • Disney/Pixar can still expand the series whenever they want. But as far as what we’ve seen, Toy Story 4 is already perfect enough as an ending of the era. But we never know, taking this with a pinch of salt, maybe they will surprise us with another installment anytime soon because of the success of Toy Story 4. Summing it up. Toy Story 4 is enjoyable for both youngsters and young at heart.

The Alien Action Adventure that Fails to Deliver: Men in Black International Review

The duo from Thor: Ragnarok (Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson) are back at it again with another movie that looks promising on paper because of the choice of cast, and of course, its name that we haven’t heard for a while. But in reality, it’s a rather huge disappointment especially for the sake of the MIB series.

It’s not about the cast, but it’s about the storyline that doesn’t make any sense is what destroyed the movie right from the beginning. Both Chris and Tessa are brave enough to handle a script like this that features multiple locations across the globe (hence the international monicker) — giving the series a fresh take from before that focuses only on New York City.

It’s sad to think that a movie series that was filled with alien action in an extraterrestrial environment that was fun to watch turned into a lackluster implementation just to meet today’s standards of comedic-action story writing.

Synopsis

  • The story starts with Molly, portrayed by Jessa Thompson, who witnessed that her parents are neutralized by the Men in Black in such a young age. She swears that she will unearth what the secret organization is all about when she gets older. As time goes by, her plans succeeded and eventually became Agent M and were then partnered with Agent H (Hemsworth) to do globe-trotting missions together.

This is where the movie starts to get off track when both of them are partnered together. The story has put both of them in situations hoping to create a chemistry that can carry the audience through. There are times where it became effective, but this kind of approach is a snooze-fest, especially for those people yearning for more in-depth character development.

Men in Black: International is a big budget movie, but there are times where it felt rather cheap, and it shows. For example, the scene where they are dropped in the middle of a dessert. The scene looks filmed on a little sandbox that can be found in your backyard (of course I’m exaggerating, but you get the point).

There was also a flaw in Hemsworth’s character as well. Early in the movie, he was shown in a scene that can turn into a huge plot twist in the end. However, the essence of such “twist” is gone, especially when it’s already self-evident enough not to know. Shown in the rest of the movie is Hemsworth’s comedic approach, which gets repetitive and bland. He was portrayed as a terrible agent that doesn’t deserve a place in the MIB, but this was done on purpose for the sake of laughs.

Thompson’s character is quite the opposite though. She was portrayed as a woman that screams attitude overload, which acts more mature than Hemsworth. Notice a pattern here? Women were portrayed as strong and sassy, while men are the ones who are weak and bland? It sounds like feminism had done its finest again.

Verdict

  • Men in Black: International features a strong duo that is shadowed by terrible storyline. It’s like they only rely on the characters alone and throw in a lackluster story hoping that it’ll save the franchise. If a sequel is planned anytime soon in the hands of a different screenwriter and filmmaker, then let’s hope that they will do it right instead of this abomination we got.

Mediocrity at Its Finest: Godzilla King of Monsters Review

If you think that the Godzilla series is finally at its deathbed, then wait until you see Godzilla: King of Monsters. However, don’t be fooled because of the name “Godzilla.” It’s actually a mediocre movie disguised in a popular name of a monster we all know and love.

Of course, Godzilla: King of Monsters has stunning visuals, and it’s the only thing that is worth watching in the movie. They also introduced new monsters as well that is utterly forgettable with little character development at all.

Synopsis

  • The story starts where an eco-terrorist steals a sonar device that can wake monsters up from the deep. He only did this to restore the world into its natural state. A group of scientists and military personnel teamed up together to keep the monsters at bay and save the world once and for all.

Taking a look at the synopsis above, you can say that the story sounds bland and stale that looks like a plot from an animated movie for kids. What’s even worse is that the monster fights are poorly executed, obscured by clouds and heavy rain paired with seizure-inducing camera movements combined with boring fight choreography.

It’s a shame because the character design of the monsters is very well done. You can say that the animators have really put their attention to detail to make the monsters as photorealistic as it can be. Not to mention, the cinematography that was executed in the most exciting way as possible if only the shaky camera movements are reduced a bit. If you want to watch the movie because of its stunning visuals without minding the story, then you’re good to go.

Verdict

  • Godzilla: King of Monsters have outdone itself on the visual effects department, but fail to deliver in the narrative side of things. The movie itself is too long combined with forgettable characters, which makes it a bore-fest. It ends with an open door that leaves an opportunity for sequels. But seeing the result of the movie, it seems like people just want to put the final nail in the coffin instead of reviving it once again.

Kicking Ass Despite the Controversy: Anna Movie Review

One of Luc Besson’s secrets of getting commercial movie success is to portray ladies in a bad-ass fashion kicking ass in the most action way as possible. There is no doubt that the director’s massive space operatic flop the “Valerian And the City Of A Thousand Planets” was poorly received by critics and moviegoers alike. However, the tables have turned with his latest 2019 action film “Anna” which was highly received worldwide thanks to its sticking-to-its-roots formula that Besson is known for.

Synopsis

  • Anna was Sasha Luss’ first movie that has her as the leading role. The film is about a ruthless woman who worked as a model, and at the same time, a spy from the Russian Government. She was portrayed as a lady that lived a hard life despite its high-demanding occupations. Things start to fire up as CIA agent Lenny Miller, portrayed by Cillian Murphy, follows her every move. The movie has its good points, paired with an ample amount of time-travel twists, which makes it kind of repetitive.

Haven’t you heard that plot before? Yes, you did. And it did share some similarities with last year’s massive hit the “Red Sparrow.” However, Anna is not a complete copycat of such. Anna even began production months before the Red Sparrow hit the big screen. But the comparisons from those who have seen both movies are unavoidable.

But as you’ve noticed, Anna hasn’t been marketed well compared to other ass-kicking female-led movies. This is because Besson has been hit with sexual assault allegations while the film is being made, hence the lack of marketing for the movie itself. There is a saying that one should separate the art from its creator. But in the case of Besson and its controversy, it looks like splitting the two is a terrible idea. However, this doesn’t stop the movie from hitting theatres. And the allegations were dismissed because of lack of evidence.

Taking a look at Anna, you will see Besson’s style of directing action movies. Sharp sound effects, over the top cinematography as a lot of action is going on the screen, combined with impressive set pieces, what’s not to love? But it all comes down to the storytelling department, where it can be hard for some to separate what’s real and what’s not. Anna’s story is intentionally jumbled paired with complex connections in between that can make it really hard to understand what’s going on. It may be impressive for some, but can be frustrating for others.

One of the movie’s selling points is their lead actress Sasha Luss. She has done an impressive job in portraying the character, which makes the movie her stepping stone to becoming big in the film industry. However, because of the controversy that surrounds its director, it seems like a thing in the past for now.

One of the best set piece in the movie is where Anna was shown in scenes in her modeling career and then transitions into her weapon-wielding action as she kicks-ass of her opponents. Both perspectives are then spliced into footages that transition back and forth, making it an eye-candy. It’s actually fun to look at. And it’s a big thumbs up to Besson’s directing skills for executing that scene very well.

Verdict Anna was such an ambitious film which is unfortunately shadowed by the director’s controversy. If only the allegations didn’t happen, Anna would have been successful in the financial department on the big screen. And also, Besson’s comeback in the film industry as wel

It Gets Better the Third Time Around: Annabelle Comes Home Review

2013’s massive horror-hit “Conjuring” has seen several sequels and prequels, turning it into a cinematic Universe just like Marvel’s. This kind of approach keeps the audience engaged, wanting for more, as well as creating a fan-base for the cinematic universe itself. It also allows writers to create stories that will connect to each film, making them a branch to each and one another.

The first Annabelle film was highly anticipated, which is then destroyed by poor storytelling. The second one was a bit of an improvement but still lacking. But things have changed with Annabelle Comes Home as it gives a breath of fresh air to the series thanks to its better-written characters and plenty of scares that can keep you awake. Gary Dauberman is the director of the third Annabelle film (who is only a writer of the previous Annabelle films), and it is an exciting debut for a first-timer like him where his movie was well-received by many.

The movie takes place between Conjuring 1 and Conjuring 2. As seen in the second Annabelle movie, the doll was locked up in an artifact room inside a house. However, this doesn’t stop the doll from unleashing its inner hell as she seeks revenge.

The movie begins where the doll was captured by the Warrens and then centers on their daughter Judy, which is portrayed by Mckenna Grace. Life is a bit hard for her as a newspaper exposes what her parents do for a living. What’s even worse is that her birthday is coming up, which will definitely result in a ruckus where she expects it to be a blast. However, thanks to her babysitter Marry Ellen, portrayed by Madison Iseman, she learned how to be strong no matter how tough her situation is.

But it all went down where the Warrens go out of a town for a night, where Judy and Mary Ellen was left in the house. To accompany the two, Mary Ellen herself invited her best friend Daniela, portrayed by Katie Sarife, to stay over with them. With Daniela’s curious nature, she sneaked into the artifact room where Annabelle was contained, surprised where there is a big warning sign on the glass where Annabelle is. The artifact room is like an engine, where Annabelle acts as the battery. Once opened, it led to a series of unfortunate and ghastly events. And it’s up to Judy, Mary Ellen, and Daniella to stop her before it’s too late.

What makes it different from its predecessors is the lighter tone of the movie. Off course, we’re not saying that you will be laughing the whole time or finding Annabelle cute despite its appearance. What it does is that it generates post-scream laughs making it a smart move despite the film’s monster-infested storyline. It’s a different approach from the usual horror films that will give you nightmares. This film is for those who enjoy horror movies while wanting to have a good night sleep after seeing such. Of course, there are also new “monsters” that were introduced in the movie, which makes it a perfect opportunity for writers to create more branching movies in the Conjuring universe.

Seeing the movie itself, you can see that Dauberman has vastly improved in the storytelling department. It’s more evident in the movie’s cinematography composed of sweeping camera movements, use of eerie space, and paired with unnerving images and scenes that can keep you awake scene after scene. You will be scared by the atmosphere of the movie itself, unlike others who only rely on jump scares and loud music.

Verdict

  • Annabelle Comes Home is the perfect end to the series’ trilogy. Despite having a bad start with the first movie, it gradually became better over time, and the improvements are there. If you’re having doubts about seeing this movie because of its predecessor’s lack of success, then it’s time to give it a try and see it for yourself.

Dark Phoenix is Another Complete Mess in the X-Men Franchise

The X-Men franchise is at it again with their tenth and final film of the series deeming to flop once more. 2016’s X-Men Apocalypse didn’t do well enough in the eyes of critics and moviegoers. And here comes Dark Phoenix hoping to shadow the negative response of their previous films. Well, it shows. Dark Phoenix is better than X-Men Apocalypse, and even better than 2006’s X-Men: The Last Stand. Not to mention, better than Captain Marvel, while sharing no specific plot details, but to the point where they have to reshoot Dark Phoenix’s climax scenes to avoid looking like a complete rip-off. Although better in some ways, it’s not a good movie. It’s one of those boring movies that is completely uninspired.

The movie starts in 1975 where young Jean Grey (Summer Fontana) unexpectedly discovered that she had powers and caused a car accident which led her to be an orphan. Years later, 25-yeard old Jean Grey (Sophie Turner) has received her much-needed attention and care in the hands of Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) and became part of the X-Men.

What’s really interesting is that Jean Grey was more fleshed out and develop in her own solo film. Compared to the past X-Men movies (or even in animations) where she was portrayed as this weak damsel in distress with uncontrollable powers. So kudos to the story writing department for giving her a much more interesting and stronger story arc that makes her a likable character for once.

The problem lies where X-Men screenwriter Simon Kinberg spent too much time relying on character development across the entire X-Men movies. This worked well with Logan, which has been the most successful comic-based movie to date. But this Jean Grey we have in Dark Phoenix is only seen once before, in X-Men Apocalypse. Which only has a small share of screen time in a rather forgettable movie. Thankfully, because of Dark Phoenix, we now have the chance to see “this” Jean Grey once again and how her origin story turned out to be.

This whole character study thing runs smack into the film’s mandate to be a popcorn movie, something it does indifferently for most of its long running time of about 113 minutes (which is okay by comic book movie standards). Kinberg is not any more than a proficient director, either of his cast or of his camera; cinematography Mauro Fiore oversees things to an utterly shocking degree. Between the two of them, they manage to make this horrible expensive film look somewhat unimaginative and uninspired, mistaking glossiness in the form of style.

The only scene where the film was worthy of being called a “popcorn film” is in the climax where the mutants are fighting of hordes of aliens, all in the form of a train fight scene in a montage way. This has been the staple of X-Men films where each mutant was showing off their powers in a sequence of set pieces just like in X-Men 2 back then. This is where the Dark Phoenix has done it right. Eye-candy fight scenes with an ample amount of epilogue scenes that finishes the movie with quality material. And the rest was garbage.

Dark Phoenix is Another Complete Mess in the X-Men Franchise

The X-Men franchise is at it again with their tenth and final film of the series deeming to flop once more. 2016’s X-Men Apocalypse didn’t do well enough in the eyes of critics and moviegoers. And here comes Dark Phoenix hoping to shadow the negative response of their previous films. Well, it shows. Dark Phoenix is better than X-Men Apocalypse, and even better than 2006’s X-Men: The Last Stand. Not to mention, better than Captain Marvel, while sharing no specific plot details, but to the point where they have to reshoot Dark Phoenix’s climax scenes to avoid looking like a complete rip-off. Although better in some ways, it’s not a good movie. It’s one of those boring movies that is completely uninspired.

The movie starts in 1975 where young Jean Grey (Summer Fontana) unexpectedly discovered that she had powers and caused a car accident which led her to be an orphan. Years later, 25-yeard old Jean Grey (Sophie Turner) has received her much-needed attention and care in the hands of Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) and became part of the X-Men.

What’s really interesting is that Jean Grey was more fleshed out and develop in her own solo film. Compared to the past X-Men movies (or even in animations) where she was portrayed as this weak damsel in distress with uncontrollable powers. So kudos to the story writing department for giving her a much more interesting and stronger story arc that makes her a likable character for once.

The problem lies where X-Men screenwriter Simon Kinberg spent too much time relying on character development across the entire X-Men movies. This worked well with Logan, which has been the most successful comic-based movie to date. But this Jean Grey we have in Dark Phoenix is only seen once before, in X-Men Apocalypse. Which only has a small share of screen time in a rather forgettable movie. Thankfully, because of Dark Phoenix, we now have the chance to see “this” Jean Grey once again and how her origin story turned out to be.

This whole character study thing runs smack into the film’s mandate to be a popcorn movie, something it does indifferently for most of its long running time of about 113 minutes (which is okay by comic book movie standards). Kinberg is not any more than a proficient director, either of his cast or of his camera; cinematography Mauro Fiore oversees things to an utterly shocking degree. Between the two of them, they manage to make this horrible expensive film look somewhat unimaginative and uninspired, mistaking glossiness in the form of style.

The only scene where the film was worthy of being called a “popcorn film” is in the climax where the mutants are fighting of hordes of aliens, all in the form of a train fight scene in a montage way. This has been the staple of X-Men films where each mutant was showing off their powers in a sequence of set pieces just like in X-Men 2 back then. This is where the Dark Phoenix has done it right. Eye-candy fight scenes with an ample amount of epilogue scenes that finishes the movie with quality material. And the rest was garbage.

An Entertaining Live Adaptation of a Videogame: Detective Pikachu Review

A lot of filmmakers have been trying how to implement a film adaptation of a video game properly. Many have succeeded (Tomb Raider 2001), and others failed (Assasin’s Creed 2016). But in the case of 2019’s “Detective Pikachu”, it seems like everything turned out well.

The movie is based on the 2016 game “Detective Pikachu” that was released exclusively on the Nintendo 3DS. It was the first live-action adaptation of the Pokemon series which fans have been excited about. Many are worried that it may turn out as a flop, but it looks like the movie has seen the brighter side of the day because of its success.

Synopsis

  • Detective Pikachu features Tim Goodman (portrayed by Justice Smith), who is a son of a police detective Harry Goodman. A mysterious car accident killed Tim’s father, and it’s up to him to find out what really happened. He traveled to Ryme and met his father’s Pikachu (voiced by Ryan Reynolds), and both of them formed a team to bring justice to Tim’s dad. Aspiring reporter Lucy Stevens (portrayed by Kathryn Newton) together with her Psyduck joined Tim and Pikachu into their adventure. As they go deeper on the mystery, they found out a mysterious thing that could put Ryme and its human and pokemon residents to danger.

Directed by Rob Letterman and written by Dan Hernandez, Detective Pikachu has a simple story with little twists and turns in between. There are also “surprises” that was already predictable as well. The movie was aimed at younger audiences, hence its PG rating, but can also be enjoyed by all ages as well.

The story is not Detective Pikachu’s strongest points, but it’s how the world (Ryme City) was implemented that you feel like you’re included in the adventure. The movie successfully portrayed the world very well and how pokemon and humans interact with one another. It gives you an idea of how it feels like to live in Ryme City and to have a very own pokemon yourself.

The relationship between Tim and Pikachu is what stands out throughout the entire movie. Kudos to Smith’s performance while talking to CGI creatures the entire film (and some humans of course). Ryan Reynolds also did a pretty good job on voicing Pikachu as well. His comedic side still shows, but only lessened to make it more family-friendly since you don’t want to hear Pikachu blasting out curse words in a PG-rated film, right? (Deadpool is waving at you).

Verdict

  • Avid fans of Pokemon will surely appreciate this masterpiece. It’s worth every penny on watching this movie in theatres, and your expectations were actually met. The choice of the cast may sound a bit odd at first (Ryan Reynolds as Pikachu is still puzzling to think about), but the formula works very well. Pokemon is a massive videogame franchise that was loved by many, and it’s surprising to see that the first live-action adaptation of the video game has ticked the right boxes.

An Exciting Title Riddled with Bad Storytelling: Brightburn Review

Developed by James Gunn and his family, Brightburn is a pretty ambitious title that didn’t deliver to what’s promised. The film was supposed to be released back then in November but was delayed when Disney fired Gunn from the third installment of Guardians of the Galaxy. Because of this, Brightburn wasn’t adequately promoted, and he even refused to show it at San Diego’s Comic-Con last year and just kept silent about it.

The movie sounds impressive on paper, but once you see it in motion, you will be disappointed that it’s too far from what you expected. Brightburn is a thriller-horror film that fails to deliver what it feels like to be a villain or a superhero that uses its powers in the wrong thing.

Synopsis

  • Married couple Tori (portrayed by Elizabeth Banks), and Kyle Brryer (David Denman) lived in a small town in Brightburn, Kansas. One night, a mysterious pod landed from the sky and crashed near their home. What they found inside was an infant, not knowing where it came from. Failing to have a child, the couple decided to adopt the infant and named it Brandon. Ten years later, Brandon lived a life just like a normal human being. He was able to make friends and even excel at his classes. But it all went down during his twelfth birthday where Brandon discovered that he has superpowers. Not knowing why he had these abilities, he then began to use them for evil and became a reckless killing machine.

Brightburn was written by James brother Brian, his cousin Mark, and was directed by David Yarovesky who was also the director of “The Hive.” What went wrong is that Brightburn failed to explore what it’s like to become a superhero or villain. It even falls short on how parenting was played out, especially when your child has superpowers to begin with.

The issue is more prominent in the script where character development was lackluster. It turned Brandon to be an evil entity in the cheapest way as possible by hearing voices only him can hear that’s coming from his pod. The “hearing voices” thing was already used a lot of times, especially in horror-thriller films and we’re hoping that Brightburn has something fresh up their sleeves, but we were left with disappointment instead. However, the cast has done an excellent job on portraying each of their characters which makes up to the terrible story writing.

On the bright side, Brightburn has done an excellent job, especially in the directing and editing department. It shows Brandon hunting his victims in the most creative yet gruesome ways as possible, and then killing them brutally that will keep you holding on to your seats. Not to mention, the use of camera angles and lighting that create a suspenseful atmosphere despite the film’s limited budget.

Verdict

  • Although lacking in proper story writing, it excelled in the visual department which was executed correctly in the most exciting way possible. If you’re a fan of James Gunn and his previous films, then you should give Brightburn a go, although not necessarily on theatres if you don’t want to waste your money on something that you would regret. Just wait for a DVD release and then you’re good. A Brightburn sequel may be possible, and here’s hoping that it’s better than what we got at the moment.